EPPO Platform
on PRAs

Scale insect records from ornamental plants help to prioritize plant health resource development

Description

Klingeman W E, Chong JH, Harmon C, Ames L, LeBude AV & Chandran P (2020) Scale insect records from ornamental plants help to prioritize plant health resource development. Plant Health Progress 21(4): 278–287. 


Estimates about which scale insect species are most frequently encountered in U.S. landscapes and commercial production systems are largely anecdotal. This survey of records maintained across about 15 years within the National Plant Diagnostic Network (NPDN) National Data Repository (NDR) returned information from 10,671 records of 192 scale insect species and 23 suspected species that were associated with ornamental plants. This broad species diversity challenges our ability to effectively train diagnosticians, can confound species identification accuracy, and impedes outreach efforts and resource development. To help focus future efforts in the development of outreach resources and diagnostic training guides, lists were assembled that identified the 60 top-ranked soft, armored, mealybug, and other scale insect taxa most frequently diagnosed within NDR records. Diagnostic service records from Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee provided more extensive information regarding sites or client types from which submitted samples originated. Results are being used to develop web-based, image-rich guides to key scale insect taxa in the southeastern United States that will explain life cycles, behaviors, and biology for pest species. These web-based guides can be exploited to optimize pest management actions.

Organisms

  • Acanthococcus azaleae
  • Acanthococcus lagerstroemiae
  • Antonina graminis
  • Aspidiotus cryptomeriae
  • Asterolecanium
  • Carulaspis juniperi
  • Carulaspis minima
  • Ceroplastes ceriferus
  • Chionaspis pinifoliae
  • Chrysomphalus aonidum
  • Coccus hesperidum
  • Comstockaspis perniciosa
  • Eulecanium cerasorum
  • Ferrisia gilli
  • Ferrisia virgata
  • Fiorinia externa
  • Fiorinia theae
  • Hemiberlesia ithacae
  • Hemiberlesia lataniae
  • Icerya purchasi
  • Kermes
  • Lepidosaphes pallida
  • Lepidosaphes pini
  • Lepidosaphes ulmi
  • Lopholeucaspis japonica
  • Melanaspis obscura
  • Melanaspis tenebricosa
  • Neolecanium cornuparvum
  • Neopulvinaria innumerabilis
  • Nipaecoccus nipae
  • Odonaspis ruthae
  • Parthenolecanium corni
  • Parthenolecanium fletcheri
  • Parthenolecanium quercifex
  • Phenacoccus
  • Physokermes hemicryphus
  • Planococcus
  • Planococcus citri
  • Planococcus ficus
  • Protopulvinaria pyriformis
  • Pseudaulacaspis cockerelli
  • Pseudaulacaspis pentagona
  • Pseudaulacaspis prunicola
  • Pseudococcus longispinus
  • Pseudococcus maritimus
  • Pseudococcus viburni
  • Pulvinaria acericola
  • Pulvinaria floccifera
  • Saissetia coffeae
  • Saissetia oleae
  • Toumeyella liriodendri
  • Toumeyella parvicornis
  • Unaspis euonymi

Files

Type File Size
Pest Risk Analysis Link to file

PRA Area

  • EPPO
  • Albania
  • Algeria
  • Austria
  • Azerbaijan
  • Belarus
  • Belgium
  • Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Bulgaria
  • Croatia
  • Cyprus
  • Czech Republic
  • Denmark
  • Estonia
  • Finland
  • France
  • Georgia
  • Germany
  • Greece
  • Guernsey
  • Hungary
  • Ireland
  • Israel
  • Italy
  • Jersey
  • Jordan
  • Kazakhstan
  • Kyrgyzstan
  • Latvia
  • Lithuania
  • Luxembourg
  • Malta
  • Moldova
  • Montenegro
  • Morocco
  • Netherlands
  • North Macedonia
  • Norway
  • Poland
  • Portugal
  • Romania
  • Russia
  • Serbia
  • Slovakia
  • Slovenia
  • Spain
  • Sweden
  • Switzerland
  • Tunisia
  • Turkey
  • Ukraine
  • United Kingdom
  • Uzbekistan